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Teaching an Accelerated African American History Survey

I'm teaching a 6-Week Course that covers the second half of our African American Survey. Included below is a kind of Distance Learning "Course in a Box." If you use any portion of these materials, please let me know. I would love to know how/if this format works for others.


Carrie Mae Weems, Untitled (Woman standing), 1990.

Gelatin silver print with text panels. 27 1/4 x 27 inches.

Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Museum purchase made possible by a grant from The Burnett Foundation.

Acquired 1995. © Carrie Mae Weems.

Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York




Hello,

You are receiving this message because you are currently enrolled in the History of African Americans since 1865 [202310 - HIST-236-14670], during the Summer II term at Montgomery College. I am your professor, Dr. Sylvea Hollis. Feel free to call me Dr. Hollis/Prof. Hollis/ Prof. or any versions of the above.

Before our class begins, make sure that you watch:

Intro Video for HIST 236

General Intro Video


Class Schedule:

This is a distance learning course that will run from Monday, July 11th –- Monday, August 19th. You will access all assignments via Blackboard in the Course Content section.

Required Textbooks:

We have one primary textbook for the course. It is available for purchase at the University Bookstore. Periodically, we will supplement textbook with additional articles and films. All additional content will be included on Blackboard.

Robin D. G. Kelley and Earl Lewis, ed., To Make Our World Anew: A History of African Americans Since 1880, Vol. II. [ISBN-13: 978-0195181357]

Library Access to Course Textbook:

The Montgomery College Library has a Full Text Version of the textbook for the class. I believe the number of downloads is limited. So, if you are interested, I suggest you try to access this free version ASAP. See directions below:

Step 1: To access the assigned textbook click this link

Step 2: Log-in via MC Library with your M#

Step 3: Download Full Text of To Make Our World Anew: A History of African Americans Since 1880, Vol. II.

If you have any problems accessing the E-book, follow up with the MC Library or via:


Need More Help?


Text Us: 240-654-1728


Book an Appointment


Call or Visit the Library



First Day of Class:

If you have not done so yet please review the outline of work for our first week on Blackboard [Course Content<Week 1]. For our first week I would like for you to:

  • Read the first chapter of the textbook

  • Read Primary Sources:

Frederick Douglass on Remembering the Civil War, 1877

Dispatch from Mississippi a Mississippi Colored Farmer's Alliance, 1889

African Americans Debate Enlistment, 1898

  • Watch: Tell Them We Are Rising

  • Complete the assigned writing assignments for your Precis 1/Discussion, Primary Source Lab 1, Film Critique 1, and Quiz 1.

DEADLINE: 7/18 @ 11:59 pm

Office hours: Available, upon request

My contact email is: sylvea.hollis@montgomerycollege.edu

Course objectives:

Upon course completion, a student will be able to:

  • Identify the various methods of social control that replaced slavery in the Southern states after the end of the Civil War.

  • Compare and contrast the various strategies of racial advancement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

  • Analyze the causes and effects of twentieth century African American migration.

  • Describe the effects of the Great Depression, World Wars I&II, and the Cold War on African American life and culture.

  • Assess African American activism in the mid twentieth century.

  • Demonstrate understanding of political, cultural, social, and economic changes in the late twentieth century.

  • Assess and evaluate the different African American cultural identities in the early twenty-first century.

  • Use race, gender, and class as categories of analysis—explaining their distinctive significance in the History of African Americans since 1865.

How to Log onto Blackboard:

Your username and password for Blackboard is the same as your log-in for My MC portal. If you have any problems with Blackboard, please click on the student help links via the Blackboard login page.

Additional Questions?:

What to expect with online classes at Montgomery College [short]

What to expect with online classes at Montgomery College [long]





Week 1


Though Justice Sleeps: 1880-1900

**Watch Introductory Videos** :


COURSE INTRODUCTORY VIDEO


General Course Intro Video


Black History in Two Minutes:


Separate but Equal: Homer Plessy and the Case That Upheld the Color Line


Frederick Douglass--The Most Photographed American of the 19th Century

Black Women Laborers


Madam CJ Walker: First Black Millionairess

  • Read Though Justice Sleeps, 1880-1900 Answer the following questions :


PRECIS 1/DISCUSSION BOARD

The chapter entitled, Though Justice Sleeps, explores the process by which African Americans experienced life after Reconstruction. Additionally, the chapter examines black community life and the everyday lived experiences of African Americans in the late nineteenth century.

In 500 words or less, answer the following questions: Why do you think the author entitled this chapter, "Though Justice Sleeps"? How does the title relate the events that occurred in African American life in the late nineteenth century?

PRIMARY SOURCE 1 (see film on how to use primary source worksheet--most helpful around timestamp 4:18)

  • Read Primary Source Lab Sources and complete worksheet on ONE of the documents. Share a history-based question that you have after reading these sources. **History-based** questions are things that can be researched. Questions about feelings, ethics, and emotions are not history-based questions.

  • Select ONE your response to complete worksheet

  • Frederick Douglass Remembers the Civil War, 1877

  • Dispatch from Mississippi Colored Farmer's Alliance, 1889

  • African Americans Debate Enlistment, 1898


FILM CRITIQUE 1

  • Watch: Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (If you have problems watching film, follow this set of instructions and search "Tell Them We Are Rising")

  • What is does the term HBCU mean? Why were they founded? Why do they still exist? Share at least one question you have after watching this series.

QUIZ 1

Take Quiz

By Monday, July 18th at 11:59 PM, make sure you upload your precis response, post your primary source lab, film critique, and complete quiz.


Week 2


Introductory Videos

Ida B. Wells: Fearless Investigative Reporter of Southern Horrors

WEB Du Bois and Paris Exposition of 1900

The Queer History of the Harlem Renaissance

Oscar Micheaux: First Black Indie Filmmaker

Tulsa Massacre


PRECIS 2

  • Read A Chance to Make Good: 1900 -1929 answer these questions via Precis:

The chapter entitled, A Chance To Make Good, explores the process by which African Americans experienced life during the first two decades of the twentieth century.

In 500 words or less, answer the following questions: Why do you think the author entitled this chapter, "A Chance to Make Good"? How does the title relate the events that occurred in African American life in the late early twentieth century?

PRIMARY SOURCE LAB 2

  • Watch film on how to use primary source worksheet (most helpful around timestamp 4:18)

  • Read Primary Source Lab Sources and complete worksheet on ONE of the documents.

  • Share a history-based question that you have after reading these sources. **History-based** questions are things that can be researched. Questions about feelings, ethics, and emotions are not history-based questions.

  • Select ONE your response to complete worksheet:


  • Ida B. Wells on Lynch Law (1905)

  • "Sir, I Will Thank You with All My Heart" (1917)

  • Declaration of the Rights of the Negro Peoples of the World: The Principles of the United Negro Improvement Association (1920)

  • Tulsa Race Riot (1931)


FILM CRITIQUE 2

  • Watch: Within Our Gates (1920) and Write Film Critique:

  • In no more than 500 words, answer the following question. Why do you believe that Micheaux named this film, Within Our Gates? Use examples from the film to support your argument. Share at least one question you have after watching this film.

  • THIS IS A SILENT FILM. FEEL FREE TO WATCH WITH THE PLAYLIST OF YOUR CHOICE IN THE BACKGROUND

QUIZ 2

  • Take Quiz


BY Monday, July 25th at 11:59 pm.


WEEK 3


Introductory Videos


Double V Campaign of WWII

The Tuskegee Study Henrietta Lacks: The Woman with Immortal Cells

Johnson Publishing Company [a script that tells the story of John H. and Eunice Johnson, founders of Ebony & Jet]


PRECIS 3

  • Read From a Raw Deal to a New Deal?: 1929-1945 and answer questions via Precis:

The chapter entitled, a Raw Deal to a New Deal?, explores the process by which African Americans experienced the Great Depression and World War II.

In 500 words or less, answer the following questions: Why do you think the author entitled this chapter, "From a Raw Deal to a New Deal?"

PRIMARY SOURCE LAB 3

Watch film on how to use primary source worksheet (most helpful around timestamp 4:18)

  • Read Primary Source Lab Sources and complete worksheet on ONE of the documents.

  • Share a history-based question that you have after reading these sources. **History-based** questions are things that can be researched. Questions about feelings, ethics, and emotions are not history-based questions.

  • Select ONE your response to complete worksheet

-The Jobless Negro (1933)

-Dorothy West, “Amateur Night in Harlem” (1938)

-Times Is Getting’ Harder (1940)

FILM CRITIQUE 3

  • Watch: Against the Odds: Artists of The Harlem Renaissance

  • In no more than 500 words, answer the following question. Why do you believe that the filmmakers named this film, Against the Odds? Use examples from the film to support your argument. Share at least one question you have after watching this film.

QUIZ 3

  • Take Quiz


BY Monday, August 1st at 11:59 pm.

WEEK 4


Introductory Videos

Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball

Ella Baker—Mother of the Civil Rights Movement

Black Power

PRECIS 4

Read We Changed the World: 1945-1970 and answer questions via Precis:

The chapter entitled We Changed the World explores the process by which African Americans experienced The Cold War and Black Freedom Movement.

In 500 words or less, answer the following questions: Why do you think the author entitled this chapter, We Changed the World?

PRIMARY SOURCE LAB 4

  • Watch film on how to use primary source worksheet (most helpful around timestamp 4:18)

  • Read Primary Source Lab Sources and complete worksheet on ONE of the documents.

  • Share a history-based question that you have after reading these sources. **History-based** questions are things that can be researched. Questions about feelings, ethics, and emotions are not history-based questions.

  • Select ONE your response to complete worksheet


-Telegrams Urging Protection for African-American Voters (6/25/1946)

-Flier with segregationist voting guide (1959)

-Southern Christian Leadership Conference Citizenship Workbook (1962)

-Pinback button for Poor People’s Campaign (1968)

FILM CRITIQUE 4

  • Watch: Walk In My Shoes (1961) and Write Film Critique:

  • In no more than 500 words, answer the following question. Why do you believe that the filmmaker entitled this documentary “Walk In My Shoes?” Use examples from the film to support your argument. Share at least one question you have after watching this film.

  • Take Quiz

BY Monday, August 8th at 11:59 pm.


WEEK 5


Into the Fire: 1970 to the Present

Introductory Videos


Black Feminism

The Birth of Hip Hop

Affirmative Action

Obama's 2008 Election


PRECIS 5

Read Into the Fire: 1970 to the Present and answer questions via Precis:

The chapter entitled Into the Fire: 1970 to Present explores the process by which African Americans experienced life since the post-Civil Rights era to the present [relatively speaking].

In 500 words or less, answer the following questions: Why do you think the author entitled this chapter, Into the Fire?


PRIMARY SOURCE LAB 5


  • Think about the types of sources used in your previous Primary Source Labs and Post Response to the following question:

  • Imagine that the year is 2075. What kind of sources do you think historians should use to best understand what family life was like for African Americans during the late twentieth and early twenty first century? Why? Feel free to make comparisons to the other types of sources you have examined throughout the history of the course. Write your response by using no more than 500 words.


FILM CRITIQUE 5

  • Watch Black Is...Black Ain't (1995) and Write Film Critique:

  • In no more than 500 words, answer the following question. Why do you believe that the filmmaker entitled this documentary “Black Is...Black Ain't?” Use examples from the film to support your argument. Share at least one question you have after watching this film.


QUIZ 5

  • Take Quiz

BY Monday, August 15th at 11:59 pm.


WEEK 6


DUE: 8/19 @ 11:59 PM

Write a reflective essay that considers your time in the course.

Read through the list of reflection questions below and select at least three you want to answer. Make sure your Final Reflective Essay on the course covers no more than 1000 words.

  1. What did I notice?

  2. How did I feel about this?

  3. Why did it make me feel this way?

  4. How was my experience of this unique to me? How did others who were there experience it differently? Why?

  5. How has this changed me?

  6. What might I have done differently?

  7. What is the meaning of this event in my life?

  8. How is this similar to something else that I've experienced?

  9. How can I use this to help someone else?

  10. How does this event relate to the rest of my life?

  11. How is this typical in my life?

  12. Was this a good or a bad thing for me?

  13. How did this experience foretell things that would happen later?

  14. Was my experience the same as someone else's or different?

  15. What skills did I learn?

  16. How can I apply what I learned to my life?

  17. How can I apply this experience to my studies?

  18. How can this help me in my career?

  19. What about this experience challenged me socially?

  20. In what way did this expand my understanding of my own culture? or a different culture?

  21. How was this emotionally important? or emotionally difficult?

  22. How did this experience relate to my understanding of theology, God, or religion?

  23. What questions did this experience make me have?

  24. How has this changed the way I think?

  25. How has this made me realize someone else was right?

  26. How was this unexpected? Or how did this fulfill my expectations?

  27. Would I want to repeat this experience?

  28. Would this experience be the same if I did it again?

  29. How did this affect me and why?

  30. Why did I have the reaction I did to this?

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