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Spring 2023

Updated: Mar 5, 2023



Syllabi This Semester:


HIST 235 African American History I [In-Person, Rockville]

HIST 235 SPRING 23 syllabus rev
.pdf
Download PDF • 354KB

HIST 236 African American History II [In-Person, Rockville]

HIST 236 SPRING 23 syllabus rev
.pdf
Download PDF • 308KB

HIST 266 African History Since 1800 [Structured Remote]

HIST 266 STR SPRING 23 late start syllabus
.pdf
Download PDF • 359KB

WMST101 Intro to Women's Studies [In-Person, Germantown]

Hollis WMST 101 SPRING 23 late start syllabus
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Download PDF • 350KB

HIST 240 Civil Rights in America [Distance Learning, Accelerated 7-Week]

HIST 240 SPRING 23_7 Week DL syllabus
.pdf
Download PDF • 342KB

Black History Month Programming:


Feb 2, 2023

A joint presentation by Drs. Sylvea Hollis and John Riedl of the History Department, this program will briefly highlight the origins of Black History Month and focus on this year's theme: "Black Resistance"



Saturday February 25, 2023 11:00am to 12:30pm Josiah Henson Museum and Park


Celebrate Black History Month at Josiah Henson Museum & Park with an educational program exploring the crucial role of the night sky in guiding and empowering freedom seekers on their journeys north along the Underground Railroad. Observe the stars from another point of view with special guest speakers: historian Dr. Sylvea Hollis, astronomer Dr. Lou Strolger, and PhD candidate Sophie Hess.

The family-friendly program will take place at the Josiah Henson Museum and Park visitor center. Free and does not include museum admission. Appropriate for ages 6 and up.


Forthcoming Events:


MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2023 | 9:00 – 10:00 PM EASTERN | VIRTUAL


Our group of public humanities scholars and practitioners will examine this theme with a care for what it means to leverage recent scholarship, while also doing this work within public history spaces. It considers the social, economic, political, and intellectual worlds of African Americans in their quest to live out the full meaning of freedom. The program pays attention to nuances and various ways that geography and ecology shaped the idea of black freedom. In so doing, presenters also will foreground the important place that shifting methodologies play in this discussion. The second part of the discussion will take place at the NCPH Annual Meeting. Sponsored by the National Park Service.


Facilitator: Sylvea Hollis, Montgomery College Participants: Yveline Alexis, Oberlin College Ista Clarke, Charleston County Parks Department Maya Davis, Riversdale House Museum Marcus Nevius, University of Missouri

This is a free virtual program. Please register to save your spot and receive the Zoom link: https://community.ncph.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1720078&group=.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 2023 | 8:00 – 9:30 PM EASTERN | LOCATION TBA


Join us for the third in a series of five roundtables designed to explore and interrogate the American Revolution ahead of the 250th anniversary. Designed as a three-part suite of programming, a virtual roundtable grounding us in the history and scholarship of slavery, freedom, and the Revolution will be held in March 2023 ahead of the annual meeting. Second, this in-person opening plenary will allow conference attendees to dig deeper into the theme “The Rhetoric of Freedom” with our facilitator and scholars in a more conversational style. We’ll follow up with a concurrent session on Thursday of the conference that is designed to provide support for interpreters and strategies as they engage our publics in these essential conversations. Co-sponsored by the National Park Service and the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Facilitator: Sylvea Hollis, Montgomery College Participants: Yveline Alexis, Oberlin College Ista Clarke, Charleston County Parks Department Maya Davis, Riversdale House Museum Marcus Nevius, University of Missouri

This plenary is free and open to conference attendees and non-attendees alike who are in Atlanta, GA, no advance registration required.

Part Three of this series is a session being held Thursday, April 13, at 10:30 am – “Interpreting Slavery and Revolution: Safe Space and Vent Session.” This session is only open to conference attendees. Sponsored by the National Park Service.


Date: Saturday May 6th, 2023 at 2PM

No registration required to attend in person. If you would like to attend virtually, please register here.


Chaired by Dr. Jennifer Anderson (Stony Brook University), this panel examines the lives of enslaved people in New York, Long Island, and the Hudson Valley. Past scholarship has primarily focused on the seaport of lower Manhattan and the labor routines that developed around an urban environment. This panel casts a larger net, inserting the Hudson Valley plantations and the slaveholders of Long Island into this dialogue of slavery in the North.

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1 則留言


maryguest.hollis
2023年3月01日

Dr. Hollis,

Your blog is the best we have ever read! You share vital information that others can use to enhance the learning experiences of their students. Your blog is a classroom opened to everyone.

You honor the educational field with dynamic research skills, knowledge, determination, and a genuine love of history. You enhance the quality of education for persons in and outside the classroom.

按讚
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